Get Fit: 5 Tips for Men over 50

Most men who reach an age of five decades realize that it can be difficult to come back from a weekend of binging or recover from the extra doughnut in the morning. We long for the younger years when we could have all of those bad habits but once we hit 50, things change.

Rather than waiting until you put on an extra 50 pounds or begin having some type of medical problem it's a good idea to adopt healthier habits. Making the right lifestyle choices can make a difference in the way you look and the way you feel. Most importantly, it can extend your life. Here are 5 tips to help get you started.

1. Reduce Your Salt Intake

A 2013 study showed that one out of every 10 deaths in US adults had a connection with eating too much salt1. 60% of those who died were men. Getting too little potassium and too much sodium in your diet can boost your blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease. Lowering your sodium by reducing certain foods from your diet, such as cheese, bread, and processed food can take you out of the danger zone. Substitute those bad foods with healthy, green leafy vegetables and get more potassium through the right foods, such as bananas.

2. Keep Your Mind Sharp

The MIND Diet is an important part of avoiding Alzheimer's when you're older. That diet includes vegetables, grains, nuts, berries, beans and small amounts of chicken or fish. Eating  healthy fats is also important according to some studies2.

3. Maintain Strong Bones

Most people consider osteoporosis to be a disease that affects women but if you are a man over 50, you may be losing bone mass as well. Supplementing  probiotics and calcium in your diet may help. The Journal of Cellular Physiology published a study that showed the connection between supplementing probiotics and boosting your bone mass. Researchers also said that supplementing with probiotics may help to reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis later in life and can aid your digestive health3. You can boost your probiotics by eating dairy products with live enzymes, eating fermented foods or taking a supplement.

4. Drink Enough Water

Most men prefer almost any beverage over drinking a glass of water but if you aren't getting enough water, your health is likely to pay for it. At least one study shows that 180,000 deaths every year can be traced back to soft drinks4. Men may have a particular problem because it can boost their risk of prostate cancer and weight gain. If you don't like the taste of plain water, add some berries, lemon or drink some carbonated water. Adding turmeric, red grapes or apple peels to your diet can also help keep your prostate healthy.

5. Go Natural for Sexual Health

You might find that your love life is suffering if you tend to snack on baked goods, regardless of whether they are salty or sweet. Getting too much trans fats in your diet can clog the arteries and boost your levels of LDL cholesterol (the bad kind) either of those can lead to erectile dysfunction. To boost your performance, include plenty of healthy fats and protein in your diet and get rid of the trans fats and refined sugars.

Aging is something that all of us must go through but it doesn't mean you need to go kicking and screaming to the grave. Maintaining good health through proper diet and exercise can go a long way in helping you to be happy and to age gracefully.

In addition to eating a nutritious diet and exercising regularly, we recommend taking NATURELO's One Daily Multivitamin for Men 50+. Unlike other one-size-fits-all supplements, our product is formulated specifically for the adult male over 50. This complete formula delivers vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, plus the cofactors that naturally occur with these nutrients — giving you Nature’s full nutritional package.

References:
1. Adults worldwide eat almost double daily recommended amount of sodium, March 21, 2013
2.  Extra-virgin olive oil preserves memory, protects brain against Alzheimer's, June 21, 2017
3.  BUILDING HEALTHY BONES TAKES GUTS, Feb. 14, 2013
4.  180,000 deaths worldwide each year may be associated with sugary soft drinks, research suggests, March 19, 2013